Ideas on how to use old/sour/slightly spoiled milk

Spoiled MilkIt happens to almost everyone, that milk you bought went bad before you could use it. -sigh- Now what? As long as the milk isn’t spoiled and chunky, you can still use it for a few different things. In the footnotes of the recipes, the instructions declare that to sour the milk you should add one tablespoon of vinegar to a cup of milk. That is clabbered milk, not sour milk, in my opinion. Then again, one could argue that what we are talking about isn’t sour milk, but soured milk. Don’t use the stuff that makes the milk jug bulge and has chunks in it.

If your sour milk tastes or smells unpleasant to you, then you should simply toss it. Sometimes “good” bacteria will have inoculated the milk and the result will be a tangy, yogurtlike flavor. Other times, bacteria that produce unpleasant flavors will have gotten the upper hand, and when this happens, it’s too late to salvage your milk. If you decide the milk in your refrigerator smells OK and is all right to keep, one traditional thing to do with (slightly) sour milk is make pudding. You can also use sour milk in cream sauces — you could try making enchiladas in a creamy, cheesy sauce, or bake a chicken breast or fish fillet with milk and herbs poured over it.

Bake with It
Spoiled milk can be used as a suitable substitute for milk when making cake or bread. The best part is that you will not taste the difference. In fact, there are a number of recipes that call for using sour milk as one of the ingredients such as sour milk ginger bread. You can also use it as a substitute for buttermilk when you are making corn bread. Lastly, it can be used in pancake batter as well.

Turn It into Cottage Cheese
A lot of individuals agree that homemade cottage cheese from spoiled milk tastes a lot better than store bought cottage cheese. The best part is the fact that it is fairly easy to make and only requires a few additional ingredients. In addition to the sour milk, you are going to need vinegar, table salt, and a little cream (or whole milk). All you have to do is heat the milk to 185 degrees Fahrenheit and then add the other ingredients. Keep in mind, you will have to refrigerate the cottage cheese for at least a week before you will be able to eat it.

WATCH OUT
Keep in mind, these are all suggested uses for milk that has soured or expired while in the refrigerator. You should never drink milk that has gone bad as a side effect of sitting in the sun or prolonged exposure to eat. It is better to use it to make something than to just drink it. If you ever feel sick or dizzy while consuming spoiled milk, you should discontinue the consumption immediately.

Make pancakes, waffles, biscuits, etc.
Depending on your recipe, a single batch will use 1-2 cups of milk. And the nice thing about this is that you can make them up quickly, and they store well. Stick them in the freezer and you’ve got goods you can grab and heat up at a moment’s notice.

Whip up a batch of hot chocolate on the stove.
It’s still fairly cold in most parts of the country right now, so a nice batch of hot chocolate will warm you up and make use of that milk. Mix 2 quarts of milk with 4 TB of raw cacao, and 4 TB of raw sugar, and you have a nice way to enjoy a few blissful moments.

Blend up some smoothies.
If you’ve got some banana, nut butter, some other fruit, and a little bit of spinach, then you’ve got a great combination to go with that milk. Of course, there are so many options when it comes to smoothies, but that’s one of my favorites.

Make a skin mask.
Sour milk is a common ingredient in facial masks. It’s great for the skin — making it smoother and giving it a more even, consistent color. Place sour milk all over the face, let sit, then rinse off with milk (strange, I know), followed by a final rinsing of water.

Milk your garden.
Pour it around plants to keep deer away, put it at the base of rosebushes to help them grow

Shine the silver.
Just pour sour milk over silver and let sit overnight to make it shine.

Recycle expired milk to make “plastic” at home.
Milk can become “plastic” because it contains casein, which makes up about 80% of the protein of milk. The basic principle is very similar to how the milk curdles itself when decaying. Casein can be isolated by acids (vinegar) and heat. It was a common and popular early form of glue, and actually was used to make aircraft windows in World War II before there were many synthetic plastics available. Now we don’t use this method to produce plastics since there are much cheaper, stronger solutions.

DID YOU KNOW?
There are no federal standard for milk expiration dates, and, in many areas, milk producers and distributors get to use expiration dates of their own choosing.

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