Poultry

Schnitzel and Spaetzel, a traditional German Dinner

Schnitzel and Spaetzel, a traditional German Dinner
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Ry’s family is traditionally German, but somewhere along the way, they lost their traditional foods and heritage, so being a homeschooling family, we did some research, and as part of the ‘unit’ we had a traditional German food for dinner! It was a hit.

One of the great things about being an American, is it’s a great melting pot of a bunch of different cultures, foods, and beliefs; but one of the drawbacks, is how easy it is to lose your heritage and keep up with the Joneses. Not saying the old ways are perfect, or that the new ways are wrong; but it’s important to strike that balance and to learn from the past.

Jäger Hänchen Schnitzel and Kartoffelspätzle - A breaded, boneless, skinless breast of chicken, topped with a burgundy-mushroom or a creamy-mushroom sauce.

Does your family have some neat traditional foods or habits that are from ‘the old country’? I’d love to hear about them!

We aren’t eating pork at the moment, so I did substitute chicken and turkey bacon, but otherwise this recipe is fairly traditional. 

Wanna skip straight to the printable recipe?
Click here.

A Wiener Schnitzel is a breaded veal cutlet. It is dipped in flour, egg, and bread crumbs, then fried in butter or oil to a golden brown. It is traditionally served with a lemon wedge, which you can use to drizzle fresh lemon juice over the schnitzel. A Hänchen-Schnitzel is a breaded, boneless, skinless breast of chicken. Lower in fat and a milder taste than the veal and pork schnitzels.

Season each meat piece with salt and pepper (both sides). Pound to an even thinness to promote uniform cooking. Let stand at room temperature for 10-15 minutes.

In the meantime, prepare your work area. You will need 3 plates – add the flour to the first one, add the eggs to the second one, and add the bread crumbs to the third plate. Arrange the plates in a row, close to the stove.

For each veal cutlet, coat the cutlet with flour, dunk it in the eggs, then coat it with bread crumbs.

Heat the butter and oil in a large, heavy skillet or pan over moderately high heat for about 2 minutes.

Put the coated veal cutlet immediately in the hot skillet. Cook each side for about 3 minutes, or until each side is a deep golden brown. Remove the schnitzel and place on a plate lined with paper towels (to absorb any extra oil). Keep warm.

Using the same pan as you made the Schnitzels in, fry the mushrooms until they begin releasing water. Remove them from the pan and set aside.

See Also:  Brown Sugar and Mustard Glazed Turkey

Add a little butter to the same pan. Add onions and bacon. Cook until onions begin to brown. Add mushrooms back to the pan, then add the broth and cream. Add salt, pepper, and thyme. Bring mixture up to a simmer, and continue simmering until liquid has noticeably reduced (about 15-20 minutes) – stir occasionally.

Stir in milk into the sauce until the sauce reaches the desired consistency (the sauce shouldn’t be too thin and be creamy). Remove pan from heat. Stir in 2/3 of the chopped parsley. Add additional salt and pepper as needed.


Spätzle are made from flour, eggs, water, and salt, the dough cannot be rolled out, as the Spätzle dough is too moist and soft. Instead, there are four ways to form Spätzle: a Spätzle-Press, a Spätzle-Sieb, a Spätzle-Hobel, or the traditional way is to spread the dough over a wet wooden cutting-board, cutting thin strips of dough with a knife. With this recipe, we are adding a bit of the goodness of the poatoes to change the texture slightly and tweak the flavors. Simple and easy to make, they are delicious and go well with almost anything.

 

Peel potatoes and cook them in boiling salt water. Allow to cool.

Mash cooked potatoes until smooth.

Sift the flour.

Combine eggs, mashed potatoes, salt, and nutmeg. Fold in the sifted flour until a tough, smooth dough develops.


Using a wooden spoon, vigorously mix the dough for at least 5 minutes, until bubbles form. If dough is too dry, add a little water until it becomes elastic.

Push the spätzle dough through a spätzle maker. (If you don’t have one or can’t find one, you can get the same effect by pushing the dough through the holes of a colander. Or you can cut the dough into strands on a wooden kitchen board.)

Bring a large pot of salt water to boil. Reduce heat so that remains hot but stops boiling. Drop spätzle into hot, salted water. Cook uncovered. As the spätzle begin to rise to the surface of the pot, remove them with a slotted spoon to a large warmed bowl. Add melted butter to the spätzle and stir to cover evenly. 

To serve, scoop a serving of spätzle onto the plate, then place a schnitzel on over it, and top with the sauce. Sprinkle some chopped parsley over the sauce. Enjoy thoroughly!


I hope you try and enjoy this meal as much as we did!
If you add some roasted broccoli or even broccoli salad to the meal, it may not be traditional, but it would count towards your daily requirements! Here are the recipes:

A breaded, boneless, skinless breast of chicken. Lower in fat and a milder taste than the veal and pork schnitzels. This is a schnitzel topped with a burgundy-mushroom or a creamy-mushroom sauce. Traditionally, this schnitzel is prepared without flour, egg, and bread crumb coatings
Ingredients
Schnitzel
  • 1 lb chicken thighs/veal cutlets/pork chops, pounded thin
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • ⅓ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup fine, dry bread crumbs
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Sauce
  • 1 lb Mushrooms, washed and cut into bite-size slices
  • 2-3 slices Bacon, chopped into small pieces
  • 1 small Onion, finely chopped
  • ½ cup Vegetable Broth
  • ½ cup Cream
  • ½ teaspoon dry Thyme
  • A small bunch Parsley, finely chopped
  • A little extra milk as needed
Instructions
  1. Season each veal cutlet with salt and pepper (both sides). Let stand at room temperature for 10-15 minutes.
  2. In the meantime, prepare your work area. You will need 3 plates - add the flour to the first one, add the eggs to the second one, and add the bread crumbs to the third plate.
  3. Arrange the plates in a row, close to the stove. Heat the butter and oil in a large, heavy skillet or pan over moderately high heat for about 2 minutes.
  4. For each meat piece, coat the cutlet with flour, dunk it in the eggs, then coat it with bread crumbs. Put the coated piece immediately in the hot skillet. Cook each side for about 3 minutes, or until each side is a deep golden brown.
  5. Remove the schnitzel and place on a plate lined with paper towels (to absorb any extra oil). Keep warm.
  6. Using the same pan as you made the Schnitzels in, fry the mushrooms until they begin releasing water. Remove them from the pan and set aside.
  7. Add a little butter to the same pan. Add onions and bacon. Cook until onions begin to brown.
  8. Add mushrooms back to the pan, then add the broth and cream. Add salt, pepper, and thyme.
  9. Bring mixture up to a simmer, and continue simmering until liquid has noticeably reduced (about 15-20 minutes) - stir occasionally.
  10. Stir in milk into the sauce until the sauce reaches the desired consistency (the sauce shouldn't be too thin and be creamy). Remove pan from heat. Stir in ⅔ of the chopped parsley. Add additional salt and pepper as needed.
  11. To serve, place a Schnitzel on a plate and top with the sauce. Sprinkle some chopped parsley over the sauce.
See Also:  Foil-Pack Chicken & Mushroom Dinner

 

Kartoffelspätzle (Potato Spätzle)
 
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: German
Spätzle are made from flour, eggs, water, and salt. Compared to Italian pasta, the Spätzle dough is moister and softer. Because of this, the dough cannot be rolled out. Instead, there are four ways to form Spätzle.
Ingredients
  • 1¼ cup + 3 tablespoons All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 lb raw Potatoes
  • 3 eggs
  • 1½ tablespoons finely grated Cheese
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • Pinch of Nutmeg
Instructions
  1. Peel potatoes and cook them in boiling salt water. Allow to cool. Mash cooked potatoes until smooth.
  2. Sift the flour.
  3. Combine eggs, mashed potatoes, salt, and nutmeg. Fold in the sifted flour until a tough, smooth dough develops.
  4. Using a wooden spoon, vigorously mix the dough for at least 5 minutes, until bubbles form. If dough is too dry, add a little water until it becomes elastic.
  5. Push the spätzle dough through a spätzle maker (this resembles a potato ricer and can be purchased at many German delicatessens or a specialty cooking stores). If you don't have one or can't find one, you can get the same effect by pushing the dough through the holes of a colander. Or you can cut the dough into strands on a wooden kitchen board.
  6. Bring a large pot of salt water to boil. Reduce heat so that remains hot but stops boiling.
  7. Drop spätzle into hot, salted water. Cook uncovered. As the spätzle begin to rise to the surface of the pot, remove them with a slotted spoon.
  8. Just before serving, warm the spätzle for 4-5 minutes in the melted butter in a large pan over medium heat. Serve immediately.

Photos courtesy of Monique Lewis via the Facebook group ‘Cannon Recipe Swap’

 

If you’ve made this recipe; I’d love to see a picture!
Just tag it with #EmmmmerzEatz and I’ll re-share!

Emma

A Military Spouse stationed in the middle of nowhere. Emma loves to cook for her family (while dodging dirty dishes). She is blessed to be a stay at home mom with 3 kiddos. She is passionate about cloth diapering, car seat safety, breastfeeding, homeschooling, frugal living, babywearing, and her Christian faith. More Molly Messy than Susie Homemaker, she has been trying to improve her housekeeping and related skills.

2 thoughts on “Schnitzel and Spaetzel, a traditional German Dinner

  1. Emily Author

    Yum! My heritage is German and my girls are learning the language now. I love German food. This will be helpful since the girls have to make a German meal as part of their lessons. Thanks for linking up to the #HomeMattersParty

    Reply

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